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UCLA Center for Accessible Education

Reasonable accommodations are determined through an interactive process between the CAE, the student, and instructional staff. It is axiomatic that reasonable accommodations must be disability-based. The academic adjustments and/or auxiliary aids, and/or modification or adjustment to practices, procedures, or policies are so that a qualified student with a disability receives equal access to a course, program, service, or activity.

Accommodations can be:

  • Changes to a classroom environment or task that permit a student with a disability to participate in the educational process,
  • Reasonable modifications to policies, practices or procedures that enable the student to participate in UCLA’sprograms, including admissions, academics, online and distance education courses, and housing.

What is an accommodation?

An accommodation is a legally mandated modification or service designed to mitigate the functional limitations associated with a student's disability. Accommodations can be:

  • Changes to a classroom environment or task that permit a student with a disability to participate in the educational process,
  • Reasonable modifications to policies, practices or procedures, etc.

Reasonable accommodations are determined through an interactive process between the CAE, the student, and instructional staff. The student’s accommodation request must be linked to the functional limitations described in the medical documentation.

What types of accommodations are often considered “unreasonable”?

  1. Accommodations that would fundamentally alter the nature of a program.
  2. Accommodations which lower or substantially modify academic or program standards.
  3. Accommodations that would impose undue financial or administrative burden.
  4. Accommodations that would pose an appreciable threat to personal or public safety.

How do I notify my professors about my accommodations?

Please follow these 2 steps:

1. To use your accommodations, you will need to complete the following steps through the CAE Student Portal. Please follow instructions from this YouTube video to request that CAE send a letter to the Faculty Portal which tells your instructors what accommodations you have. This letter only informs your instructors that you are a student in their class who is registered with CAE and has approved accommodations. A few reminders about your accommodation letters: 

  • Once requested, you will either see that your accommodation letter status says “Sent” or “Confirmed.” Your instructors may view the letter, but not confirm it, as these are two separate steps. The letter does not need to be “confirmed” for your accommodations to be active. If you have concerns about receiving your accommodations, you can send your instructor an email to confirm, and copy your CAE Disability Specialist on the email.   

  • Request your letters early in the quarter! We recommend during week 1 or 2 of the quarter. You will complete this step at beginning of each quarter that you want to use your accommodations.  

2. After you complete step #1, please also email the following to your instructors and copy your CAE Disability Specialist:  

“Dear Instructor, I am registered with the Center for Accessible Education (CAE) and recently submitted a request to make my CAE accommodation letter available to you. You can view my accommodation letter in the Faculty Portal. After clicking on “View Letter,” please complete steps #1 and #2: review the accommodation letter, and confirm receipt of the accommodation letter. 

**If you are approved for any test accommodations, add this: I am approved for exam accommodations, and CAE's new procedure is that if you are unable to proctor my exams, you should proceed to immediately fill out the Testing Request form to submit your request for proctoring support—as they require 7-days’ notice.**

If you have any questions about my accommodations, you can follow up with my CAE Disability Specialist, who is copied on this email. Thank you."

    Test Accommodations

    Accommodations for tests mitigate the impact of barriers in the standard exam setting for students with disabilities, and allow students with disabilities to demonstrate their knowledge and skills. Exam accommodations might include assistive technology or auxiliary aids; additional time for the exam; or a distraction-reduced exam setting. In order to receive the testing accommodation once approved by a CAE Disability Specialist, students should make their requests by releasing their accommodation letters via the Student Portal.

    Please refer to the proctoring checklist for instructions and procedures.

    When should I release my accommodation letters?

    Students requesting test accommodations are expected to release their accommodations letter via the Student Portal during week one of each quarter, as soon as they are approved, or at least 7 days prior to the date of the exam. Please note that the process for requesting testing/proctoring services from the CAE has changed. The procedure will no longer involve students requesting accommodations for each exam; rather, after reviewing the accommodation letter, faculty, if necessary, will immediately email caetesting@saonet.ucla.edu to request CAE assistance, or fill out this form to submit their request for proctoring support.

    Students that make a request for exam accommodations in less than 7 days do not provide the University with a timely notice by which to coordinate the service. As a result, any exam accommodation requested less than 7 days of notification to the CAE will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis yet the University may be unable to provide proper exam arrangements.(For example: if an accommodation letter is released the day of or the day before an exam date (and this includes a Friday release date for a Monday exam) this may not be considered enough time to make and coordinate the testing accommodations.

    The CAE will make a good faith effort to accommodate students who do not request proctoring in a timely fashion on a case-by-case basis. If the Testing Center cannot add a student to the schedule, the student will be referred to their instructor and/or CAE Disability Specialist to determine alternative arrangements, if any.

    Students that have disability-related flare-ups that prohibit them from taking the exam as scheduled must contact their CAE Disability Specialist immediately, or soon thereafter, to assess the reasonableness of the request. Make-up exams cannot be guaranteed but will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

    What happens after I release my accommodation letters?

    If your exam is scheduled with the CAE Testing Center, you will be notified that your exams are confirmed with CAE and to view your updated testing location via the CAE Student Portal, 2 days prior to exam. Please check the CAE Student Portal under “My Schedule” for the testing location of your exam and to confirm that your instructor has booked the exam.

    Please note: if it says “Prof Accomm” that means your instructor will be administering the exam and providing the accommodation(s). If you see this, please contact your professor for more information.

    What should I know before I take my exam with CAE?

    • Testing locations do not always have clocks. Bring a watch. However, cellphones/smart watches are not permitted.
    • Arrive to testing location ON TIME with a picture I.D. (Bruin card, driver’s license, or passport) and appropriate materials allowed for exam (pen, pencil, blue book, calculator, etc.). If you arrive late, the time will not be added.
    • If you arrive more than 30 minutes late to an exam, we will need professor permission for you to begin the exam.
    • Know your accommodations and which accommodations you have requested to use during the exam.
    • Know how long you have and know your exam end time. If you think the length of time is incorrect, check with testing staff prior to starting your exam. Keep track of your time during the exam.
    • Notify your CAE Disability Specialist of any changes in disability or medical condition (these changes may necessitate a change in your testing accommodations).
    • Notify Testing Center staff via email caetesting@saonet.ucla.edu if you decide to cancel an exam. Making up or rescheduling your exam will not be guaranteed as it is typically determined by your professor. Please contact your Disability Specialist if disability-related circumstances have arise.
    • If you have a question during an exam, let the proctor know. The proctor may be able to contact professors via phone or email. If not, a proctor may escort you to the classroom to speak directly to the professor or one of the TAs.
    • All students must notify the proctor when leaving a testing room (e.g. to use the restroom or to take a break).
    • Typically, there will be 10-20 other students in the same room taking an exam. Dividers and ear plugs are offered to students to help assist in making the testing area as distraction-free as possible.
    • When testing with CAE our expectation is that all students abide by the Student Conduct Code.

    Notetaking Support

    Audio Recording

    This option allows students to record class lectures using their laptop or cell phone. This is a good option if a student utilizes a specific recording app or program that they want to continue using, and allows faculty to know that you are approved to audio record in class.

    Glean

    Glean is a web- based application that allows students to capture audio and upload slides, diagrams, and text notes to include alongside each recording. Students are able to capture presentations without writing and can highlight key points for review. Learn more about Glean in one minute here.

    • Glean can be accessed online or downloaded to your computer desktop.
    • Glean visualizes audio as bars, which can be coordinated with typed notes and visual supports (such as lecture presentation slides or handouts). Glean allows students to audio record lecture notes in real time using a smartphone, tablet, or laptop and uses audio, text, and images.
    • Glean can help you to organize notes, as you are able to group lectures by class or subject and label them. Labels, power points, and handouts are searchable using the online application, desktop version, or via cell phone using Glean Mobile. Try a 30 day free trial of Glean here.
    • Here are some helpful videos:
    1. Video: Get Started with Glean
    2. Video: What is Glean?

    Otter Voice Notes

    This web-based application offers audio recording with automatic transcription. Otter is designed to understand and capture long-form conversations that take place between multiple people. 

    • Otter records conversations from your phone or computer. Imports or syncs recordings from other services and integrates seamlessly with Zoom.
    • Get real-time captions and, within minutes, a searchable transcript synched with audio. You are able to add photos, speakers, and key phrases. Please visit this Otter Website Link for more information or a free trial.
    • Here are some helpful videos:
    1. Video: Otter AI The Student Perspective
    2. Video: Otter App Transcribes
    3. Video: Otter Zoom Recording

    Livescribe Smartpen:

    This smartpen synchronizes handwritten notes with recorded audio, making the ubiquitous pen more useful in today’s world. Livescribe Smartpens convert handwritten notes and audio to a digital format for access through the devices we use daily, fundamentally changing the way handwritten notes are accessed and shared. Pen and paper is still the most popular method of notetaking. Please see the Link to Livescribe Smartpen Demo Video to learn more.

    • Hardware device (with supplemental free software)
    • Livescribe Smartpen matches live recorded audio to handwritten notes taken on specialized paper
    • Both audio and notes can be converted into electronic versions and accessed through desktop software allowing students to record lecture notes for later review. Please see Livescribe Smartpen Instructions for more information.
    • If you are interested in trying out a Livescribe Smartpen, you can loan one out from CAE for the quarter! 

    Note Taking Express

    A mobile application designed to record lectures. This application allows you to write notes yourself or utilize a full-time team of professional note takers who provide supplemental notes.

    • Available in downloadable application or desktop software
    • Students can upload an audio recording or video of a lecture. Most common files will work, for example m4a, mp4, wav, or a downloaded Zoom recording. Then, a professional notetaker watches it, takes notes, and sends notes back to the student.

    Peer Notetaking

    The CAE matches you with a peer notetaker who is a student in your course, and you will receive a copy of their notes.

    • This may be useful for students who have difficulty extracting relevant points from course material or have difficulty both listening back to audio recordings and reading through transcripts.
    • Please note: We highly recommend technology-based notetaking options over peer notetaking, as there are many benefits to these technology-based options, including that they are reliable and provide more individualized control over the notetaking process.

    ** For all notetaking support accommodations (except peer notetaking) students are required to have a signed audio recording agreement on file. You can find the audio recording agreement on our website.

    Adjusted Attendance

    What is the adjusted attendance accommodation?

    If a student has a chronic documented disability with unpredictable or cyclical acute episodes, adjustments to the attendance policy may be appropriate as an accommodation and will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

    How is this accommodation determined?

    This accommodation is determined by an individual assessment of, but not limited to:

    1. The student’s functional limitations listed in the medical documentation.
    2. The student’s narrative in relation to their functional limitations.
    3. The course requirements.

    What is the purpose of the accommodation?

    1. The purpose of this accommodation is to mitigate, to the greatest extent possible, the impacts of the student’s disability.
    2. The accommodation is meant to adjust when or if there is an exacerbation of disability-related symptoms that prohibit a student’s ability to attend class, lab, or discussion section.

    The accommodation does not:

    1. Apply retroactively
    2. Entitle the student to have all absences excused.
    3. Waive classroom participation requirements.
    4. Make adjustments for:
      1. Academic course load
      2. Multiple assignments due in close proximity
      3. Studying for exams or other assessments
      4. Scheduling conflicts
      5. Employment, appointments, or other personal obligations
      6. Time management issues
    5. Allow the student to utilize peer notetaking in lieu of attending class. If you are approved for this accommodation, you are still expected to meet the course requirements, including independently accessing missed lecture material, turning in any assignments that might be due, etc.

    Why does the CAE need to speak with my professor if I am approved for this accommodation?

    The CAE is to conduct "an individualized inquiry" with respect to requests for an adjusted attendance policy. The student may be required to provide current documentation that independently supports the request for the attendance policy to be considered as a reasonable accommodation. First, it must be understood that documentation that supports a student's need for an adjusted attendance policy does not establish entitlement to waive attendance requirements on all courses. Secondly, the CAE must ensure that any adjusted attendance requests do not fundamentally alter course objectives or essential elements of the course.

    As a result, CAE consults with your instructor to determine what would be a reasonable attendance accommodation, given the nature of their course. If the accommodation is found to be unreasonable, the CAE will assess for an equally effective accommodation.

    Can I make the request directly with my Professor, TA or Instructor?

    Instructional staff should not make inquiries into the nature of a student’s disability, nor assess for the reasonableness of a requested adjustment on the basis of a disability. Thus, all requests for an adjustment to be made that are related to a student’s registered disability must first be directed to the CAE for an individualized review, as CAE Disability Specialists have direct knowledge of how the disability impacts the student in an academic setting.

    I am approved for the adjusted attendance accommodation and I’m experiencing a flare-up. What do I do?

    It is the student’s responsibility to initiate a conversation with their CAE Disability Specialist prior to (or soon as possible thereafter) when requesting an adjustment to the attendance policy. It is understood that such requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis and students may be required to submit updated documentation that support the request.

    As a student, what am I required to know about this accommodation?

    1. You are expected to attend class regularly, arrive prepared for class, and be knowledgeable of the course material previously covered.
    2. Exception to the attendance policy does not mean exception to any of the academic requirements of the course. Students are required to fulfill all course requirements and will be held to the same evaluation standards as specified in the course syllabus.
    3. Absences unrelated to the documented disability are not covered by this accommodation.
    4. Although an exception to the attendance policy may be made, absences may have a negative impact on academic performance simply because of the content and experiential learning that has been missed by not being in class. For this reason, students should make every attempt to attend class and to observe deadlines for submission of assignments.
    5. Instructors are not responsible for providing extraordinary assistance to students to help them catch up after a covered absence has occurred.

    Procedure:

    I am approved for the adjusted attendance accommodation and I’m experiencing a flare-up, what is the procedure for requesting an adjustment to my course(s) attendance policy?

    It is the student’s responsibility to initiate a conversation with their CAE Disability Specialist prior to a missed class, or as soon as possible thereafter, when requesting an attendance adjustment. It is understood that such requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis and students may be required to submit additional documentation that supports the request.

    Students will:

    1. Contact their CAE Disability Specialist when the need for a disability-related absence occurs.
    2. Make their letter of accommodation viewable to their faculty member through the online portal.
    3. Let their professor know that they are requesting a disability-related attendance adjustment, which will be confirmed by their CAE Disability Specialist.

    Your CAE Disability Specialist will:

    1. Conduct "an individualized inquiry" with respect to the request for any adjustments to a course attendance policy. The student may be required to provide documentation that independently supports their requested adjustment to a course(s) attendance policy.
    2. Communicate directly with the faculty member(s) regarding any requested attendance adjustments that are directly related to a student’s disability.

    Your instructor(s) will:

    1. Notify the CAE of receipt of the accommodation request.
    2. Faculty will notify the CAE if the adjusted attendance accommodation is believed to fundamentally alter the nature of the course. If it is determined that the accommodation would fundamentally alter the nature of the course, faculty are to communicate with the CAE in a timely manner and identify, in good faith, if an equally effective accommodation may be reasonably implemented.
    3. Contact the CAE if a request is made directly by the student to adjust the attendance policy. This ensures that the CAE is able to engage the student in the interactive process and take into account the student’s limitations when determining if an adjusted attendance accommodation is reasonable.

    What is a reasonable allotment of total absences?

    As UCLA operates on the quarter system, the CAE generally considers the following allotment of absences reasonable for a standard 10-week course. However, please note, any approved adjustment to an attendance policy as a reasonable accommodation must be determined on a case-by-case basis.

    1. 4 absences in a course meeting 3 times per week
    2. 3 absences in a course meeting 2 times per week
    3. 1 absences in a course meeting 1 time per week

    I’m having a very difficult quarter and I’ve already missed at least four classes. What should I do?

    Please schedule an advising appointment with your CAE Disability Specialist to discuss your options.

    Adjusted Assignment Deadlines

    If you are a student who experiences unexpected disability-related flare-ups, you may be eligible for adjusted assignment deadlines. Adjusted assignment deadlines may be considered reasonable accommodations for students with acute, unexpected, or episodic conditions.

    Adjusted Assignment Deadlines in Consultation with the CAE

    FAQ’s and Procedures

    What is the adjusted assignment deadline accommodation?

    If a student has a chronic documented disability with unpredictable or cyclical acute episodes, adjustments to deadlines may be appropriate as an accommodation and will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

    What is the purpose of the accommodation?

    The accommodation is meant to adjust when or if there is an unexpected, uncontrolled and/or exacerbation of disability-related symptom(s) that prohibit a student’s ability to submit an assignment by an established due date.

    When considering adjusted assignment deadlines, what types of assignments is the CAE referring to?

    For the purposes of this accommodation, adjusted deadlines refer to in-class assignments, papers/essays, lab reports, and other take-home assignments.

    How is this accommodation determined by the CAE?

    This accommodation is determined by an individual assessment of, but not limited to:

    1. The student’s functional limitations listed in the medical documentation.
    2. The student’s narrative in relation to their functional limitations.
    3. The course requirements.
    The accommodation does not:

    Entitle the student to submit all assignments after established deadlines.

    Make adjustments for:

    • Academic course load
    • Multiple assignments due in close proximity
    • Studying for exams or other assessments
    • Scheduling conflicts
    • Employment, appointments, or other personal obligations
    • Time management issues
    Why do you need to speak with my professor if I am approved for this accommodation?

    The CAE is to conduct "an individualized inquiry" with respect to requests for an adjusted assignment deadline. The student may be required to provide documentation that independently supports their request for extended time on an assignment as an academic adjustment. First, it must be understood that documentation that supports a student's need for extended time on tests and examinations is not sufficient to support a request for extended time on all assignments. Such documentation does not establish entitlement to extended time on all assignments regardless of the nature of the assignment and/or the timeframes involved.

    The CAE must ensure that any adjusted assignment deadlines do not fundamentally alter course objectives, which may be found in the syllabus statement. As a result, CAE consults with your instructor to determine what would be a reasonable deadline extension given the nature of their course.

    Can I make the request directly with my Professor, TA or Instructor?

    Instructional staff should not make inquiries into the nature of a student’s disability, nor assess for the reasonableness of a requested adjustment on the basis of a disability. Thus, all requests for an adjusted deadline to an assignment that are related to a student’s registered disability must first be directed to the CAE for an individualized review, as CAE Disability Specialists have direct knowledge of how the disability impacts the student in an academic setting.

    I am approved for the adjusted assignment deadline accommodation and I’m experiencing a flare-up. What do I do?

    It is the student’s responsibility to submit a request to their CAE Disability Specialist prior to an assignment’s due date (or soon as possible thereafter) when requesting an adjusted deadline. It is understood that such requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

    Procedure:

    I am approved for the accommodation, what is the procedure for requesting an adjustment to my assignment due date?

    Students will:
    1. Fill out the adjusted assignment deadline form request and email their CAE Disability Specialist to inform them of the request. 
    2. Let their faculty know that they are requesting an disability-related extension, which will be confirmed by their CAE Disability Specialist via email.
    Your CAE Disability Specialist will:
    1. Conduct "an individualized inquiry" with respect to the request for an adjusted deadline. The student may be required to provide documentation that independently supports their requested extended time on an assignment as an academic adjustment.
    2. Communicate directly with the faculty regarding the approved timeframe for the adjusted assignment deadline.
    Your instructor(s) will:
    1. Notify the CAE of receipt of the suggested timeframe for the adjusted assignment deadline.
    2. If there are concerns regarding the timeline (e.g., assignment is chunked into parts, scaffolding of assignments, pacing of assignments, group projects, grades submissions due dates for the course, etc), faculty is to communicate with the CAE in a timely manner and identify, in good faith, a reasonable timeframe for the adjusted assignment.
    3. Faculty will notify the CAE if the adjusted assignment deadline is believed to fundamentally alter the nature of the course.
    4. Contact the CAE if a request for an adjusted assignment deadline is made directly from the student. This ensures that the CAE is able to engage the student in the interactive process and take into account the student’s limitations when determining an adjusted assignment deadline.

    Priority Enrollment

    What is Priority Enrollment (PE)?

    PE allows undergraduate students to register for courses before enrollment is open to all students. There is no Priority Enrollment for summer classes.

    What is the purpose of Priority Enrollment as an accommodation with CAE?

    PE provides students with an opportunity to arrange a schedule (to the greatest extent possible) that is suitable to their disability-related needs. CAE students approved for this accommodation are able to enroll in their College/School maximum unit limit (19/20/21) during PE.

    Do other groups get Priority Enrollment at UCLA?

    Yes, PE groups include Regents Scholars, athletes in NCAA sports, qualified veterans, foster youth served by the Guardian Scholars Program, homeless youth, and students with dependents. If you are a student in any of these groups and CAE, let us know that you are already receiving it.

    Who qualifies for Priority Enrollment as an accommodation?

    Undergraduate students who may qualify for PE typically include, but are not limited to:

    • Students who require a course schedule with travel time built in due to disabilities that impact mobility, speed, stamina, and/or endurance. This could include spacing out classes.
    • Students who require services that necessitate significant planning and time on part of the CAE to arrange: ASL interpreters, real-time captioning, Alt Format, certain exam accommodations, etc.
    • Students who require a specific schedule due to significant or chronic disabilities, or those following strict medication or treatment regimen impacting their ability to attend classes at certain times of day

    Priority Enrollment does NOT:

    • Apply to a student’s first quarter at UCLA, as they will register for classes during Orientation
    • Guarantee availability of classes or the provision of courses/sections at specific times of day
    • Make adjustments for stress/anxiety related to registering for classes, or getting classes that are needed to graduate on time

    We recognize that the process of registering for classes at UCLA can be difficult. Stress related to the registration process is separate from a disability-related need for an accommodation to have equal access to your education. We encourage you to meet with an academic advisor to help you in developing alternative schedule plans, should your top choice schedule not be available.

    How long do I have to enroll in my classes during Priority Enrollment?

    All students have until the end of the Priority Enrollment window to add classes, regardless of start day/time. 

    My accommodations expire at the end of this quarter. Do I qualify for PE for the next quarter?

    If your accommodations expire at the end of the quarter, you will not qualify for Priority Enrollment for the next quarter. To extend your accommodations past their expiration date, please connect with your CAE Disability Specialist for more information.

    Does Priority Enrollment apply to graduate/professional students?

    Priority enrollment may not be applicable to graduate and/or professional programs. The CAE will assess requests for priority enrollment on a case-by-case basis. 

      Foreign Language Substitution

      UCLA does not have a university-wide foreign language course requirement. Requirements vary across majors, programs, schools, and colleges within the University.  Please see https://catalog.registrar.ucla.edu/ucla-catalog18-19-141.html or contact your academic counselor/advisor for more information about whether your school/program/department has a foreign language requirement.

      Students with disabilities are often able to successfully complete foreign language courses by incorporating strategies to compensate for their difficulties with specific learning and/or content areas or having in place the appropriate accommodations. However, students with a documented disability that significantly impacts their ability to learn a second language may request an accommodation for a foreign language substitution.

      The University does not grant curriculum waivers as a disability-related accommodation. However, when appropriate, course substitutions may be approved as an accommodation. If approved for this accommodation, students are still responsible for meeting the credit requirements of their program of study and the University.

      How is this accommodation determined?

      A foreign language substitution is an accommodation approved by CAE on an individual basis through an interactive process between CAE and the student. It may be reasonable when it is evident that there are challenges in learning language related to a students’ qualifying disability. It is often seen specifically that there is a history of challenges related to language and learning languages in comparison with the student’s aptitude for learning other subjects.

      Types of Documentation we look for:

      1. If being requested on the basis of a learning disorder, ADHD, or traumatic brain injury, psychoeducational testing is required that provides evidence of limitations related to language (i.e. auditory processing, memory, processing speed, reading abilities, receptive and expressive language abilities, etc.). CAE staff thoroughly assess the psychoeducational evaluation for a particular profile/pattern of scores that suggests difficulty learning a second language. If the scores demonstrate generally average performance for other subjects but significantly lower performance on measures relating to language, then evidence of a weakness related to language/language learning is established.
      2. Limitations associated with speech or communication disorders can also qualify a student for foreign language substitution. Speech pathologists would typically diagnose speech/language disorders.
      3. Limitations related to hearing can also qualify a student for a foreign language substitution. An audiogram would typically be reviewed.

      A foreign language substitution would not be provided for:

      • Non-disability related issues (e.g. English language learners, general difficulty with foreign language, disinterest in taking a foreign language class).
      • Anxiety related to foreign languages.

      How to request a foreign language substitution:

      I am already registered with CAE: 

      1. There is no need to re-apply to CAE. 
      2. Please email your CAE Disability Specialist with your request- documentation from your provider specifically addressing this accommodation request will be required.

      I am NOT registered with CAE yet: 

      1. Apply for CAE Academic Accommodations.
      2. Provide supporting documentation.
      3. Monitor your UCLA email for status updates and next steps. 

      What happens after?

      The student will be notified of CAE’s determination:

      If the request is approved as an accommodation:

      1. The CAE Disability Specialist will provide student with a letter of support for the foreign language substitution. 
      2. The student will be directed to schedule an appointment their academic counselor/advisor to acquire a list of possible course substitutions.

      If the request is NOT approved as an accommodation:

      1. The student can submit any additional documentation for reconsideration of their request, or other alternative accommodations may be discussed to support the student in taking a foreign language course.

      Remote Access

      CAE continues to closely monitor pandemic related operational and student needs as the Los Angeles region and UCLA community moves to lift restrictions and take gradual steps to return to in-person instruction. Our office understands the questions and concerns this may raise for students with disabilities and will continue to assess COVID-19-related disability accommodation requests on a case-by-case basis. Any student with personal pandemic related medical concerns is highly encouraged to engage in the interactive process with CAE to review reasonable accommodation options.  

        How do I request remote access for my classes as an accommodation? 

        I am already registered with CAE: 

        1. There is no need to re-apply to CAE. 
        2. Please email your CAE Disability Specialist with your request- please be specific in which classes you are asking for support and provide the syllabi for each. 
        3. Additional documentation from your provider specifically addressing this accommodation request may be required. 

        I am NOT registered with CAE yet: 

        1. Apply for CAE Academic Accommodations.
        2. Provide supporting documentation.
        3. Monitor your UCLA email for status updates and next steps. 

        *Please note these important details: 

        • To ensure timely processing of requests, students should submit a request as soon as courses are finalized (or at least 2-3 weeks before your classes begins). Later submitted requests will still be considered, but course delivery options may be limited past this deadline. 
        • Remote access, if approved, is on a per-quarter/semester basis, and course-by-course basis.
          • Students who are approved for remote participation in one course will not be automatically eligible for remote instruction in other courses or in future quarters/semesters.
          • If you were approved for an accommodation for a previous quarter, your request will need to be re-assessed and may require new documentation.
          • Please contact your CAE Disability Specialist for more information and to make the request* 

        What information does CAE need from documentation to assess for remote access as an accommodation?

        Students are able to submit our Verification of Disability form

        The CAE has found it very helpful if the following information can be included in your documentation:

        Below is the information the university is looking for in evaluating an individual’s request for disability-related COVID-19 accommodations. Providers should include the following in your letter of support:

        1. Describe your professional relationship with the student on which you are basing your treatment plan (e.g. type of treatment, length/history of relationship).
        2. Please confirm the student’s relevant medical or mental health diagnoses and state whether you believe that the requesting person meets the definition of having a disability as defined by the ADA, as described here: https://adata.org/faq/what-definition-disability-under-ada (if unsure about disability qualification, please state).
        3. A statement of support for accommodations to specifically address vulnerabilities of contracting serious complications from COVID-19. If you have recommendations for non-pharmaceutical mitigation measures and academic adjustments that would sufficiently address the concerns, please identify which ones and any combinations that are suggested.
        4. If the provider believes that there are no non-pharmaceutical interventions and/or academic adjustments that would sufficiently address the disability-related concerns, and you are recommending the accommodation of remote participation, please include anestimated end date when the student should be able to resume in-person participation. If you have recommendations on parameters or accommodations to support their return to in-person participation, please share.
        5. If you are recommending only remote participation, please describe the relationship between the request for an accommodation for remote participation for disability-related reasons and the barrier impacting the students’ ability to engage in full and meaningful participation in an on-campus experience. Questions to consider include: compared to their peers, what significant negative impacts will this student face if they are on campus? How would remote participation mitigate these negative impacts in a manner that other mitigations will not achieve and in ways that go beyond the typical benefits any individual receives from having online classes? Do you believe that remote participation is essential for the student to effectively participate in and benefit from their academic work?
          1. For students with CDC-recognized COVID-high-risk conditions (e.g. diabetes, etc.): The description should include a holistic assessment of the student’s COVID-19-related increased health risks for being on campus, considering: their unique medical profile, the latest information on vaccine efficacy, and the university’s safety practices.
          2. For students without CDC-recognized COVID- high-risk conditions (e.g. anxiety disorders, ADHD, learning disorders, etc.): The description should include an explanation of how the student’s COVID-19-related concerns about being on campus will disproportionately affect them compared to their peers such that remote participation is the only viable option. This impact must go beyond the typical stress or nervousness that most people are expected to feel in readjusting to an in-person experience.

        What can I do if I have difficulty obtaining or providing documentation to support that I need remote access as an accommodation?

        If students are concerned about obtaining or providing documentation required to register with the office, please reach out to CAE for assistance. We also recommend outreaching to the available campus resources listed below:

        Arthur Ashe Student Health & Wellness Center

        Counseling & Psychological Services

        Case Management Services

        You can also reach out to CAE:

        1. Apply for CAE Academic Accommodations
        2. Email Associate Director, Laura Czajkowski at lczajkowski@saonet.ucla.edu directly and provide information about your situation.
        3. Monitor your UCLA email for status updates and next steps

        Disclosures: CAE will not use or disclose any medical information you provide for any other purposes unless you authorize such disclosure or if such disclosure is otherwise required by law.

        Why would remote access to a course be denied?

        When considering any accommodation request, CAE must determine if approving or implementing the accommodation would create a fundamental alteration to the course, how the course is assessed, or how the course was intended to be delivered. Whether an accommodation is “reasonable” – as defined by the ADA – requires CAE to engage in the interactive process with the student, department, and instructor of record.

        When a remote request is received by CAE, we engage in an in-depth review of the course to determine whether it can be equitably delivered in a remote format. To assess this, CAE works with the instructor of record to review the content of the course, current delivery method of the course, and current technological capabilities of the assigned course meeting space. As this review must be conducted on a course-by-course basis, students are required to make the accommodation request each term.

        If remote access would not provide a truly equivalent learning experience for the student, or would require a fundamental alteration to the stated learning objectives of the course, the request would be denied. In those instances, CAE would investigate alternate accommodations that would reduce the disability related barrier to allow the student to safely attend the course in person.

        What other alternative accommodations or support can be offered if remote access is not approved as an accommodation? 

        • Accommodations with CAE (note: this is not an exhaustive list, just common examples): 
        • Notetaking Support- Notetakers provided to attend in person and provide notes and/or individual recordings of the lectures
        • Taking a reduced course load to limit potential exposure/time on campus
        • Adjusted attendance in consultation with CAE 
        • Enrolling in a course with fewer total students to limit exposure 
        • Access to additional personal protective equipment

        What if I am not a student with a disability but would like to request remote access? What is available to all students? 

        The following are academic adjustments suggestions that are available to all UCLA students: 

        • Enroll in courses already being taught in a remote format (refer to Course Planner in MyUCLA).
            • Advising support is available to assess “reordering” certain courses in students academic plans to prioritize remote courses now, delaying the required in-person courses until a future semester
        • Enroll in courses that are taught in camera-equipped classrooms, and attend through viewing the recorded or live-streamed lecture. 
        • Returning undergraduates can Declare Nonattendance for Fall quarter, or take a Leave of absence (Planned Academic Leave (PAL) if needing to take off 2 or more consecutive quarters).
            • Graduate students can take a LOA in accordance with Graduate Division policies. 

        What if I still have questions? 

        I am already registered with CAE: 

        1. Please email your CAE Disability Specialist.

        I am NOT registered with CAE yet: 

        1. Email caeintake@saonet.ucla.edu
        2. Attend a Disability Specialist Drop-in hour. Please refer to the calendar on the CAE website at https://cae.ucla.edu/ to see drop-in days an times.

        Alternative Format

        Students with visual or learning disabilities who are unable to read standard printed material may have classroom materials converted into alternative formats. This includes Braille, e-text, and large print. We can also help connect students with existing resources that offer books in alternative formats.

        Please check out the Alternative Format page for more information.

        Adaptive Furniture/Equipment

        What is the adaptive furniture/equipment accommodation? 

        The need for adaptive furniture accommodations is approved through an interactive process between the student and a CAE Disability Specialist and must be supported by the documentation of the effects of the student’s disability. Examples of adaptive furniture that may be requested include wheelchair-accessible tables, padded and adjustable chairs, and chairs with or without arms. 

        What is the purpose of adaptive furniture/equipment as an accommodation with CAE? 

        The purpose of this accommodation is to ensure equal access and full participation in classroom activities for students with certain types of disabilities. 

        Maintaining Placement in the Classroom 

        CAE furniture should not be moved throughout the classroom once placed. Whenever possible it should be left in its place. 

        If Issues Arise 

        Please note: There will be signs labeling each piece of furniture. If there is an issue with another student using the furniture you have requested, or if the furniture is being moved around the room throughout the quarter, please ask your instructor for assistance right away, and contact your Disability Specialist. The instructor will generally be able to resolve the issue in the most timely fashion.  

        If needed, faculty may want to make a general announcement to the class. We recommend using the following script: "Adaptive/Ergonomic furniture has been placed in the classroom for students who need it for access. Each piece of CAE furniture has a laminated tag attached that notifies people not to use or move the furniture. Please be respectful and do not use or move this furniture unless it has been checked out to you." 

        Procedure: 

        I am approved for the accommodation, what is the procedure for requesting this for my classes each quarter?  

        Students will: 

        1. Register for classes.

        2. Make their letter of accommodation viewable to their faculty member through the online portal. 

        3. Contact their CAE Disability Specialist when the need for adaptive furniture in your classroom arises. We recommend this communication be at least one week before classes begin to ensure that furniture will be available to you on the first day of class.  

        4. Provide to your Disability Specialist your schedule of classes, including days, times, and locations. 

        Your CAE Disability Specialist will: 

        1. Ensure that the CAE is able to acquire the necessary furniture. 

        2. Will email our campus partners in the Office of Residential Life (who will apply signage to the relevant items and deliver them to your classrooms) and your instructor to ensure the furniture is in the classroom prior to the first day of classes.  

        Real-Time Captioning

        Real-time Captioning may be available for hearing-impaired students. We require that students receiving real-time captioning services not share notes or transcripts with any other students, or use notes for any other purpose other than as class study notes without consultation with the CAE and the expressed consent of the professor.

        Sign Language Interpreters

        Sign Language interpreters can be provided for academic or University activities. To ensure quality of service for our students, the CAE provides two interpreters for classes of more than one hour in length. The CAE will provide either sign language or real-time captioning based on the student's preferred communication method.

        BruinAccess Transportation

        Students with permanent or temporary mobility impairments may request assistance with traveling around campus and to adjacent residential areas through BruinAccess transportation service. This service is operated by UCLA Transportation. The CAE works in collaboration with Transportation to evaluate student requests for the BruinAccess van service. Visit the UCLA transportation page for more information.

        UCLA Parking

        For information on parking, please review the UCLA Transportation website. Students seeking a parking permit should first apply for a parking permit through the Bruin ePermit system

        Students seeking disabled parking who do not qualify for a state issued disability placard: the CAE can assess if parking would be a reasonable accommodation due to a disability-related reason, on a case-by-case basis, and as a temporary interim measure.

        What information does the CAE need for a temporary parking allocation due to my disability?

        That assessment would require submitting the Parking Request and Verification Form, which you can request by emailing us at caeparking@saonet.ucla.edu . This form is needed for those that do not fully meet the DMV criteria but are able to meet most (i.e., few ft. of difference in walking). Section A of the Parking Verification Form is required to be completed by your physician. When completing the verification, you want to ensure your providers responds to the following questions to certify the need for a disability parking allocation by meeting one or more of the following criteria: 

        • Cannot walk 200 feet or more without stopping to rest:
        • Cannot walk without the use of, or assistance from, another person or brace, cane, crutch, prosthetic device, wheel chair or other assistive device.
        • Is restricted by lung disease to the extent that forced expiratory volume for 1 second when measured by spirometry is less than one liter or the arterial oxygen tension is less than 60 mm/hg on room air test:
        • Uses portable oxygen;
        • Has a cardiac condition to the extent that functional limitations are classified in severity as class III or IV, according to standards accepted by the American Heart Association;
        • Is severely limited in the ability to walk due to arthritic, neurological or orthopedic condition;
        • Cannot use stairs.

        Has an equal degree of disability to those described above (please describe the diagnosis and the functional limitations of disability in relation to a campus parking accommodation).

        Is the parking allocation temporary or permanent?

        The parking accommodation is an interim, temporary accommodation and is approved for one quarter only. The accommodation would not be for a designated accessible parking space. The parking accommodation would allow access to a particular designated parking allocation within a specific parking structure. If you are in the process of obtaining an accessible placard or permit with the DMV, you can submit the Parking Request and Verification Form and any information confirming the DMV process so we can provide an interim approval of a permit.

        What if I need an accessible parking spot or to park in different locations?

        All students seeking to receive access to a marked accessible parking spot should already have a DMV placard. Each state establishes criteria and procedures to issue accessible parking permits (often in the form of distinctive license plates or placards) to individuals with disabilities. For the state of California, the information is provided through the DMV website. UCLA is committed to providing accessible parking spaces as described in the mandate. The CAE does not allocate accessible parking permits for marked parking spots that are strictly designated for those with state issued placards.

        Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals (non-housing)

        What is a Service Animal?

        A Service Animal can be a dog or miniature horse that is individually trained to do work or perform a task for an individual with a disability, including physical, sensory, or other disability. The work or tasks performed by the Service Animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability. No other type of animal is considered a Service Animal, as defined by the ADAAA. A Service Dog identification vest or harness is not required. Additionally, there are no breed-restrictions when it comes to Service Dogs, regardless of state or local regulations regarding breeds.

        Service Animals in Publicaly Accessible Areas

        In accordance with the Animals on University Property, policy 135, students with Service Dogs may bring their Service Dogs on all areas of UCLA's campus that are generally open to the public, unless the presence of the dog would be a fundamental alteration of the program or service, or would result in a health or safety risk to the dog or some aspect of the environment (e.g. presence of dog hair would violate the integrity of a sterile lab). In such instances, if the service the dog provides is obvious, e.g. a guide dog for a blind person, the university can ask the two questions and nothing more:

        1. Is this a service animal that is required because of a disability? and
        2. What work or tasks has the animal been trained to perform?).

        Once the person affirms that the dog is trained to perform specific work or tasks and that the animal is needed due to the person’s disability, they must be allowed access to any publicly accessible areas.

        Does a Service Animal Need Approval?

        Title II of ADA that applies to Universities states that a service animal must be permitted to accompany the disabled person in any location that is generally open to the public. Classrooms, research labs, food preparation areas and dining halls, and housing are not publicly accessible, as only students or employees with access are generally permitted. Thus, if a student wishes to bring their Service Dog into UCLA housing or one of the above locations, they must request an accommodation through the CAE. Students with service animals are encouraged to register with the CAE as soon as possible as this will allow CAE to provide formal documentation to the student, verifying the role of the Service Dog and confirming support for its presence with the student in various settings. Registration with CAE also allows our office to notify appropriate campus partners of the dog’s presence for safety and emergency support for the animal as well as the student.

        Any student with a service animal requesting to bring the service animal into places on campus not generally open to the public (i.e. classroom, dining halls, research labs, etc.) must submit an:

        1. Accommodation Request Form (or Housing Accommodation form if specifically for housing), and

        2. Answer two questions (1) Is this a service animal that is required because of a disability? AND (2) What work or tasks has the animal been trained to perform?

        Please note: When an individual with a Service Animal is asked the two questions above, they should be able to describe the specific task(s) that the dog is trained to do, such as, “The dog is trained to bark when it is time for my medication.”  Individuals should be able to clearly identify the signal or action the dog is trained to perform. 

        What is an Assistance Animal?

        This section explains the specific requirements applicable to an individual’s use of an Assistance Animal (refer to: Animals on University Property, policy 135.). For information about allowing Assistance Animals for individuals with disabilities in University housing, visit https://cae.ucla.edu/students/housing#service_and_assistance_animals.

        Assistance Animals can be any animal and are not trained to perform specific tasks directly related to an individual’s disability. Instead, assistance animals may provide necessary emotional support to an individual with a disability but are not considered a Service Animal under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

        Where can Assistance Animals be on campus?

        To protect public health and safety, UCLA regulates the types of animals allowed on University property. State and local regulations provide the basis for University policies intended to protect the campus community from potential health and safety hazards posed by animals brought to campus (UCLA Policy 135). Per UCLA Policy 135, an individual with a disability may establish necessity for an Assistance Animal’s approval in University housing and employee work areas; however, Assistance Animals are not permitted in other areas of the University (e.g. dining facilities, academic buildings, athletic building, facilities, classrooms, labs, etc.) unless an exception is granted by the CAE.

        Determination of an Assistance Animal

        If the applicant is providing third-verification as support for an assistance animal (non-service animal), visit the General Documentation Guidelines and Required Documentation for guidance on essential components of the documentation. The student is to apply using the CAE Academic Accommodations Application for an Assistance Animal. The student must submit reliable disability-related information which: (1) verifies that the person meets the Act's definition of disability (i.e., has a physical or mental impairment that limits one or more major life activities), (2) describes how the needed accommodation mitigates one or more functional limitations, and (3) justifies the relationship between the student’s disability and the need for the requested Assistance Animal as a necessary accommodation for access in the requested environment.

        Therapeutic Relationship and Documentation from the Internet

        In accordance with the University of California Office of the President, the University does not accept letters from numerous online companies who (in exchange for a fee) purport to offer verification or certification of the need for an emotional support animal.

        California Assembly Bill 468 (September 2021) describes the criteria that should be met for a health care practitioner to provide support for an Assistance Animal, including: “Establishes a client-provider relationship with the individual for at least 30 days prior to providing the documentation requested regarding the individual’s need for an emotional support dog (122318.a.3).”

        The CAE Disability Specialist team will base the reasonableness of the therapeutic relationship as described by The American Counseling Associations Code of Ethics C.2.a Boundaries of Competence and the Human-Animal Interactions in Counseling (herein referred to as HAIC) statement regarding Assistance Animals (valid through March 2024). Specifically, HAIC states that:

        “…counselors abstain from writing letters for persons seeking counseling or assessment for the sole purpose of obtaining an ESA recommendation letter unless the counselor has specialized training and experience in working with the human-animal bond in counseling such as would be outlined in the ACA AAT-C Competencies, due to the potential risks involved for clients, the public, the counselor, and the animal."

        Generally, mental health care professionals who have had no contact with a patient except for limited encounters specifically intended to produce an ESA letter are not considered reliable; to confirm the professional-client relationship as such limited encounters lack diagnostic rigor and the level of familiarity with the functional limitations arising from the diagnosis to support robust recommendations.

        HANDLER’S RESPONSIBILITIES

        1. A service animal must be housebroken (i.e., trained so that it controls its waste elimination, absent illness or accident) and must be kept under control at all times by a harness, leash, or other tether, unless the person is unable to hold those, or such use would interfere with the service animal’s performance of work or tasks. In such instances, the service animal must be kept under control by voice, signals, or other effective means.
        2. Service animals generally should accompany their handler at all times so that the dog can provide the service it is trained to perform.
        3. The handler is financially responsible for any damage (including but not limited to medical expenses or cleaning costs) to persons or property caused by their service animal.

        GUIDELINES FOR MEMBERS OF THE UCLA COMMUNITY

        To ensure equal access and nondiscrimination of our community members with disabilities, members of the UCLA community must abide by the following practices:

        1. Allow service animals to accompany people with disabilities on campus;
        2. Do not ask for details about a person’s disabilities;
        3. Do not pet a service animal, as it distracts the animal from its work;
        4. Do not feed a service animal;
        5. Do not deliberately startle, tease, or taunt a service animal; and
        6. Do not separate or attempt to separate a person from their service animal.

        If a member of the UCLA community has a disability that may be affected by the presence of animals, please contact the Center for Accessible Education (CAE) office. CAE is committed to ensuring that the needs of all people with disabilities are met and will determine how to resolve any conflicts or problems as expeditiously as possible.

        Sources: Occidental College, Service Animal Policy; ADA Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals

        Co-Curricular Programs

        The CAE can support registered students with accommodations related to student organization events and/or co-curricular activities. Reasonable accommodations for co-curricular activities will be determined with students on an individualized basis. 

        Clinicals/Clerkships/External Placements

        The CAE can support registered students with accommodations related to clinicals, fieldwork, or external placements that are credit-baring. Reasonable accommodations for these types of experiences will be determined with students on an individualized basis. 

        Community Engagement

        The CAE can support registered students with accommodations related to Community Engagement sites connected to seminars through the UCLA Center for Community Engagement. Reasonable accommodations for these types of experiences will be determined with students on an individualized basis.